Wednesday, 9 February 2011

New Gurney Website

On behalf of the Ivor Gurney Society, in my spare moments between editing the Coronation March, to be premiered in June, completing the Gloucester archive catalogue and writing the PhD, I have recently been developing a new website, expanding the resources to include sample pages of manuscript, examples of Gurney's music and poetry, articles by and on Gurney, details of archives, and many other resources. Some of this is yet to be fully implemented, but the website as it stands has today gone 'live'.

Visit www.ivorgurney.org.uk to explore the new site, and visit it again in the near future to take advantage of the developing resources. You can even take advantage of the Society shop, through which editions of the Society Journal can be purchased, and should you not be a member already, you can join online.

6 comments:

Pamela said...

An excellent start, Philip. Thank you for making the new website a reality. It is simple and easy to use.

Pam

Philip Lancaster said...

Gurney's recollections of Sir Charles Stanford are now available of the Gurney Society website, under 'Articles by Gurney'. A fascinating view of his teacher...

Mathias Richter said...

Great work, Philip!
May I suggest a further subpage listing settings of Ivor's poems?
Regards,
Mathias

Philip Lancaster said...

Matthias,
Many thanks for your suggestion. In due course, once the full bibliography is completed, all of the settings of Gurney's poetry will indeed be available on the site, so watch this space! I hope to get round to this in the next few weeks or so.
Best wishes,
Philip

michael newth said...

Congratulations on the new website, Philip. You are doing a great service for a great artist, which is, and always will be, much appreciated by the circle of Gurneyophiles your own many-faceted work is widening daily. Michael Newth, on behalf of all Antipodean songlovers.

Friend of Cranham boy. said...

Have just bought a 1st edition of Gurney's poetry. How moving. I went to visit his grave at Twigworth Church; seemed a poignantly sad spot, and in need of a loving tidy up. Do not forget him Severn meadows.